Ib English B Extended Essay Example

The International Baccalaureate® (IB) online curriculum centre (OCC), a key resource for educators at IB World Schools, includes several examples of extended essay titles.

These highlight the diverse range of topics covered by International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) students during their extended essays.

Some examples are:

  • “An analysis of costume as a source for understanding the inner life of the character”
  • “A study of malnourished children in Indonesia and the extent of their recovery after a period of supervised improved nutrition.”
  • “Doing versus being: language and reality in the Mimamsa school of Indian philosophy.” 
  • “The effects of sugar-free chewing gum on the pH of saliva in the mouth after a meal.”
  • “To what extent has the fall in the exchange rate of the US dollar affected the tourist industry in Carmel, California?”
  •  “What level of data compression in music files is acceptable to the human ear?”

Also available in the OCC, the Handbook of Procedures for the Diploma Programme has guidance on choosing a subject for the extended essay.

The OCC is only available to existing IB World Schools.

You can also purchase examples of essays in the IB Store. These essays fulfil the requirements for an ‘A’ grade in the extended essay.

If your school is not one already, learn how to become an IB World School in order to implement the DP.

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David Ripley7 December 2017 - 18:56

This seems a bit tricky, Selda, and you're right to be cautious. I don't know the prose poem by Kincaid, but I can only imagine that the whole approach is fundamentally different, in technical/literary terms, to 'The Bell Jar'. This could possibly be useful ... but only if the style/approach of each had some direct relevance to the research question. I presume that the research question must have something to do with the themes & message of each work - since what else would two such radically different genres have in common? Does each work have something distinctive to say about the protagonist? Or about human nature? Or what?

I think the IB would accept in principle the comparing/contrasting of two different genres ... but only if, in practice, there is some credible argument for doing so. I would require the student to (1) explain clearly what point she is trying to make, and then (2) produce a very clear and explicit research question addressing the point.

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